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. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of w
strong support for the ambassador. >> ambassador rice has done an excellent job for the united nations and is qualified for a number of positions in the foreign policy arena. i will leave it at that. >> president obama shows his support of susan rice as well. he had his first white house news conference after his election. the president took exception to republican senators critical of rice. if they want to come after any one they should come after me. >> kelly wright, thank you very much. senator lindsay graham is one of the three senators who have a lot of questions for ambassador rice. >> he gave us a preview of what he will be looking for during today's discussion. >> she asked to meet with us i will listen to what she has to say about her role in benghazi. the more i know about benghazi the more upset i am that the consulate was even open on september 11th. when you look at the history about the dangers we should never have been open or heavily reinforced. during the attack i am more core idea about how we couldn't help them for 7 hours. a spontaneous event caused by video turn nu
to you. it is 14 minutes after the hour. here's a look at what you missed while you were sleeping. united nations announce ago new round of talks today in kwut tar on global warming. even though a lot of country's budgets are strained by big financial problems some countries say they will spend more cash tackling the climate issue. service into lower manhattan along the trade centerine has resumed. sandy has knocked down that line. another one affected is running again through the hard hit long beach area but on a weekend schedule. perfect. thank you, heather. >> cyber monday is just getting started. retarryls are already hailing this weekend. estimated $59 billion for stores on-line. we are all breaking down the numbers for a red-letter day. >> 247 million shoppers visiting storeses as well as their web site. they spent $427 each. now on-line spending on black friday alone also surged. first ever thanksgiving thursday also brought in solid numbers with more than $6 million spent on the web on the holiday. >> you covered thursday and friday how about today? >> it is likely to believe the
support. >> ambassador rice has done an excellent job at the united nations and highly qualified for any number of positions in the foreign policy arena and i will leave it at that. >> today's meeting place between ambassador rice and her staunchest critics on capitol hill. after his reelection president obama took exception to republican senators critical of rice saying if they want to come after anyone they should come after me. >> gretchen: we remember that. why is no one talking about susan rice, she went out on the talk shows and got the talking points from the white house and said what they wanted her to say. >> brian: she said the intelligence. >> gretchen: that's why she would be secretary of state. she did what she was asked to do and did it well and it worked with the electorate you could argue and now she will be secretary of state. what is going to stop it? >> steve: not necessarily. senate aides. administration is having her sell herself up on capitol hill today and what she is doing, she is appealing to the moderates, in particular republicans from georgia and tennessee. th
ambassador to united nations, go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparation and responsibilities for that job. and that's troubling to me as well. why she wouldn't have asked i'm the person that doesn't anything about this and i'm going on every singer show, but in addition, the fact that it's not just the talking points that were unclassified. clearly it was part of a responsibility as an ambassador to united nations to review much more than that. [inaudible] >> before anybody could make an intelligent decision about promoting someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more. to this date, we don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors conducted one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said the night of the attack, as of this date. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends felt like a john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision about ambassador bolton's qualifications. john bolton, the then ambassador, and democratic saying we're not going to go, we're no
as their constitutional rights as american citizens, putting slave property into territory owned by the united nations. in 1857, the infamous dred scott decision united states supreme court affirmed the southern constitution. republicans in contrast never. no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth theories compromise from a critical portion of on some bits out with division of territory and most often was a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line westby on louisiana purchase other way to the border of california. now, after this rather lengthy preface, i am going to get to my main topic, why lincoln rejected albeit compromise within the territory. but there must be one thing more. i'm going to talk about three different men tonight. one of them all if you know, abraham lincoln and who he was and what he did. the other two are not so well known. for probably a number if you are probably familiar with henry clay, the
the united nation's reviews much more than that. i [inaudible] >> before anyone can make an intelligent decision regarding someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more for the state. we don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said tonight at the attack has been shared with congress says that this day. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends thought like john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision qualification. john bolton the ambassador and democrats talk in their fields saying we're not going to vote, not going to consider this nomination until they get basic answers to our concerns. .. >> we are now live with condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public schools. they will discuss america's education system and its impact on security. it is part of a event hosted by the excellence in foundation for education. right now we are listening to introductory remarks. >> the first african-american woman to
? ambassador is former ambassador to the united nations for special political affairs, are they better or worse now? >> they are in a process. president morsi's move was clearly an overreach. where they are now is negotiating a constitution. what opponents of morsi will say in shaping this constitution they will put in to place into effect a permanent of dominance for the muslim brotherhood. that is why they are so up in arms because they fought against mubarek for many years. >> gregg: isn't that what is happening here. he has usurped all power, he has pronounced these untouchables and new fair oh of egypt and they are calling him. tens of thousands have taken the street to denounce morsi and burning the offices of muslim brotherhood in two cities. where do you see this going, ambassador? >> there was broad support for mubarek after and many people in the streets of cairo and egypt think that the former regime got off lightly. with that said, i think there is a widespread ceiling they are entering a new phase in which the fundamental institutions and democratic protections are in jeopardy. tha
was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation. so winning the civil rights a precondition of winning the liberty across the globe. no i think looking from the outside if you'll forgive me, the same danger now. go to china and i criticize them for the lack of democracy. but they say yes, they are educating all of their people. in the middle east and i talked to people there on the edge of radicalism. they say look at the -- [inaudible] justices in your british and european and ame
and the discourse around women because susan rice, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations has taken a kind of public attack and we want to ask whether or not her womanhood has anything to do with that. more in a moment. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. if you're still having difficulty breathing, ask your doctor if including advair could help improve your lung function. get your first full prescription free and save on refills at advaircopd.com. [ male anno
, the republicans determination, too well the north into the unit that could win a national election without any southern support, republicans repeatedly condemned the south as aggressive, undemocratic, even un-american. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, southern sectional radicals known as fire eaters, those people who preached the gospel of this union, they took to the public platform and to the newspaper columns to proclaim that the crisis of the south was at hand. the south had to act immediately to protect itself from the hatred of evil republicans, cries of secession filled the southern air. now, this was not the first time sectional crisis had gripped the country, however. there have been several sharp sectional disputes prior to 1860. each of these, each of the major ones had been settled by a compromise. here i will point specifically to the four critical ones. first, the constitutional convention of 1787 in philadelphia. the missouri crisis of 1820, had to do with the admission of missouri as a slave state, the future slavery in the louisiana purchase which, of course
are barred from challenging any of his decisions. a united nations official expressed serious concern saying this could cause a volatile situation. >>> a woman clowning around near the tomb of the unknowns and a worker that took the picture was fired. she was snapped pointing her middle finger shouting near an arlington national cemetery sign that asked for silence and respect. they took that on a paid trip by their employer. >>> halle berry's ex-boyfriend released on $20,000 bail, after getting into a fight with her current fiance outside her l.a. home thursday. gabriel aubry was hospitalized and later arrested on battery misdemeanor charges. aubry and halle are in a bitter custody dispute. >>> it is back in business this morning. mary thompson joins us from the new york stock exchange. good morning. >> good morning, thomas. markets close early this post holiday session. investors are looking to build on recent games. s and p and nasdaq up the last four sessions. what's on focus? retail stocks, given we had the official kickoff for the shopping season, many yesterday. also investors watch g
but the united states of america is held together by a great national creed not by ethnicity or blood or religion, our national creed is an aspiration will narrative that it doesn't matter where you came from. it matters where you are going. you can come from homeless circumstances and do great things and the only way that is true is if you have access to a high-quality education and if it ever becomes the case as it is increasingly now, as i said many times i can look at your zip code and the social fabric of this country has no chance to hold together and we will be picked one against the other and those who are capable and those who are not. those who are employable and those who are not. i can assure you that you might not be able to control your circumstances but you can control your response to your circumstances. that will no longer be the way americans think about themselves or each other and that gives way to entitlements. at core, the real problem for us in national security is not just our competitiveness abroad, the great national narrative, this cohesion that has made us the country
want to think how random they can get he realizes the seating arrangement at the republican national committee is going to play a crucial role in determining the nomination for the republicans and the next president of the united states. >> host: okay we will be back after a brief break. >> host: we left ourselves at the chicago convention and 1860's and we are talking about lincoln as an extreme leader as an unfiltered leader coming out of left field and you set the scene on his obscurity but he has some advantages so tell us what effect this has as the convention plays out. >> guest: his team is able to recruit supporters of cross illinois and the way they recruit them is their testing them on how weld their voices are and they bring them into chicago on discounted tickets since he was a real return he could arrange that and the print fake tickets for the convention and a stack the rafters with these lincoln supporters so every time his name is mentioned the supporters start yelling and screaming and shouting their support so much that the windows of the hall at cliche in response
nation. in 1857, there was an infamous decision and the united states supreme court confirmed the constitutional review. republicans, in contrast, never. the republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later, the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all dealt with the divisions of territories. most often there was a proposal tuesday extended west beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this preface, i'm going to get to my main point. when lincoln rejected all compromise with regard to territories. but there must be something more. i'm going to talk about three different men tonight. one of them, abraham lincoln, you know what he was and what he did. one of two americans, so well-known. the great kentucky statesman, henry clay, and william henry seward of new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency was by far the most notable and well-known republican in the
, in fact, early 1793. it's the beginning of the first bank of the united states. we have -- europeans lending to the u.s. really since the nation began. and lending to the country itself, but also, a lot of private lending and a lot of private lending is -- turns out to be not very good at paying it back and so the failure to pay back led to the 1819 panic. same thing in 1837 and again in 1857. our reputation in britain in the early part of the 19th century is terrible. we're -- they call us again and again a nation of defalters, a nation of deadbeats effectively. >> the terms like dead have a negative connotation and not for lending and borrowing, if it weren't for debt we wouldn't be the country we are today, would we? >> that's right. i mean, we could not have expanded west. there's an image of freehold pioneers, you know, broadening in to the west. relying on nothing but the first institution that really spreads america to the west is the store. the store provides the european goods that are necessary, plow points and all these other sorts of things and we borrow and borrow to mak
is the negotiator. he gives part of the treaty and then he comes back to united states and the senate has to ratify it. their 96 centers at the time in 80 of them have said that they want the united states to ratify the treaty and join the league of nations under some conditions. 80 is well more than enough to make the ratification. >> host: they need two-thirds. >> guest: two-thirds, yes. ratification is not hard. you need 64 or 65. the problem is the senate republicans led by henry cabot lodge who wilson had known for many decades, they don't want to give wilson a try and. some of them are opposed to joining the treaty and they have reservations about the sovereignty. many of them are willing to join the treaty with a condition. these reservations are not huge. the british for example will eventually say they have no problem with the treaty. it's not an obstacle for them. >> host: they are not deal breakers. >> guest: they shouldn't be deal breakers. very few people view them as deal breakers. henry cabot lodge knows wilson and lodge says wilson, you know he might have reservations on the princip
announcer ] the united mileageplus explorer card. the mileage card with special perks on united. get it and you're in. monarch of marketing analysis. with the ability to improve roi through seo all by cob. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. i'm going b-i-g. [ male announcer ] good choice business pro. good choice. go national. go like a pro. >> schieffer: back now with our panel. jon meacham, let's say thomas jefferson realized he had a fiscal cliff the country was going to go over. what do you think he would do? >> one thing he did every night when congress was in session, more or less, he had lawmakers down to dinner. he broke with the federalist cut canom of precedent asks very formal dinners and formal toftsz. he had what he called pell-mell. people came down, sat down, sat wherever they could, and they would have dinner together. he would write family members and say i'm going to be an unpunctual correspondence because dinner is here and i'm
? >>heather: and a possible huge change in united states defense policy amid turnover in personal. owe new faces could impact our national security. d states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends dember 7th. so now's the time. visit care.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>gregg: time now for the top of the news. egypt's stock market taking a tumble after president morsi's taking a power grab possibly sending egypt's troubled economy into trouble. >>heather: and $27 billion needed to clean up after hurricane sandy and will go to hiring more than 5,000 unemployed people in new york. >>gregg: strong
solution to the problem. so i think with so many he could have united the people of good will to address this problem and that polarized the nation and was the beginning of polarization that would never end until a civil war. >> if we could bring john quincy adams to the day, what do you think he would like and not like america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas. our attempt to dictate to society's the kind of society as they have to have. when he had the opportunity as the secretary of state to intervene, monroe would have done whatever he could in the pro-democracy movement so to speak he pointed out that these people have no history of self-government. religiously or politically they had never been exposed to self-government. their political culture and family culture did not tolerate. he said this is a lost cause we must not involve ourselves and said he would not involve us in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, no political history or religious history of self governance. they don't know what it means.
, quote, peacefully grant the state of texas to withdraw from the united states of america and create its own new government. as "the washington post" dana milbank put it in a recent column f obama were serious about being a good steward of the nation's finances, he would let them go. did you hear that? because many of those states are what dana milbank said are government takers, they take more in federal money than they pay in taxes. alabama gets $1.71 from the federal government for every $1 paid in taxes. louisiana gets $1.45 in federal aid for every $1 they pay in taxes. author of "bush's brain," and james braxton peterson associate professor of english at lehigh, and michael steele, former chair of the rnc and a political analyst here at msnbc. gentlemen, this is an extraordinary thing but let's talk about this, professor peterson, recent "daily beast" article you talked about using maps in 1859 to america today where states are petitioning to secede following obama's election. you write they were pro-slavery or open to slavery. this same collective of states were required to be rac
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
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pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, november 27, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i now move to proceed to calendar number 419, s. 3254, the defense authorization bill. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 419, s. 3254, a bill to authorize aeption prosecutes for fiscal year 2013 for military activities in the department of defense and so forth and for other purposes. mr. reid: we're going to recess, as we normally do on tuesdays, from 12:30 to 2:15 to allow for our weekly caucu
to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., november 26, 2012 to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: at 5:30 today, all postcloture time on s. 3525 on the sportsmen's act will have expired. there will be two roll call votes at that time. the first vote will be on a motion to waive the budget act, and the second will be on passage of the bill as amended. mr. presiden
. remember, open enrollment ends friday, december 7th. we can help. call unitedhealthcare to learn about medicare plans that may be right for you. call now. ♪ jon: the people behind "consumer reports" magazine raising new concerns about the nation's pork supply. they say they examined nearly 200 samples of pork with many of those samples testing positive for salmonella, lysteria and staph. to make matters worse the consumers union says 90 percent of the bacteria are actually immune to antibiotics. in other words, super bugs. but the national pork producers council president is responding saying consumers union, which runs "consumer reports", resorted to sensationalism because the science it used wouldn't stand up to even elementary scrutiny. it is another attempt by that advocacy group to push a social agenda not based on science, one if successful would take choice away from consumers. let's bring in dr. lee van nokia cure, adjunct assistant professor at lsu health science center in shreveport. they said the sample size, 200 sample, 198 samples, not very big for a scientific study. >>
. the pledge allegiance says one nation under god, indivisible, so that the country is indivisible. that is the hope for the country, as a unit. >> we want to remind our viewers we have a special line for people who have signed a petition to secede from the united states. our next call comes from michael and florida. he welcome to the program. are you there? >> i agree with paul. i think we should cut washington and send them adrift. >> what made you want to sign the petition? do really think that could happen? >> i think it can and i think it would be a good thing. we would not be tied up in all of the bureaucratic nonsense. >> would you see florida as becoming its own country? or maybe grouping with other states? >> the latter. host: we had a war over that. caller: we won. host: which way would that be? mike, you still there? we had a war over that and did not turn out too well for the guys trying to secede. be ok thishink it'll time. professor? guest: it is interesting that the states got to get there, and the mind -- may not be contiguous. it might be florida and texas would fo
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)